American Hairless Terries Dog Breed (Complete Guide)

The American Hairless Terrier Dog Overview

The American Hairless Terrier is a tiny, well-muscled, energetic terrier that can be hairless or coated.

Although the breed’s forebears pursued rodents, the American Hairless Terrier is unsuitable for hunting due to the hairless variety’s lack of coat.

His acute hunting instinct, on the other hand, is unaffected

American Hairless Terrier Highlights

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  • American Hairless Terriers come in all sorts of colors, including black, sable, blue, brindle, red, and brown. Their skin or extremely short, fine coat is sometimes a solid color, and other times it is a blend of two or three hues.
  • Because of their low shedding, they are ideal for allergy sufferers. They still shed dander, so they aren’t completely hypoallergenic—no dog is.
  • Make sure your AHT receives at least one solid half-hour walk per day, as well as numerous small active play sessions throughout the day.
  • Active children will enjoy playing with American Hairless Terriers. They are, however, on the little side, and overly enthusiastic children could easily harm your AHT. Playtime should always be supervised.
  • American Hairless Terriers get along well with other dogs, but when it comes to cats, they retain the predatory drive of their Rat Terrier parents, therefore they may chase.
  • These dogs do not tolerate being left alone for extended periods of time. They require attention and validation, making them ideal for large families or energetic city dwellers.
  • AHTs are extremely intelligent and inquisitive, and they adore pleasing their owners. They may try to test you at first, but if you continue to train regularly, your AHT will understand the pecking order.

American Hairless Terrier Breed Features & Ratings:

Rated base on a 5 Star Scale

  • ENERGY LEVEL:                                2 Star
  • EXERCISE REQUIREMENTS:           2 Star
  • PLAYFULNESS:                                  3 Star
  • AFFECTION LEVEL:                           3 Star
  • FRIENDLINESS TO DOGS:                4 Star
  • FRIENDLINESS TO OTHER PETS:    4 Star
  • FRIENDLINESS TO STRANGERS:     3 Star
  • WATCHFULNESS:                             2 Star
  • EASE OF TRAINING:                         4 Star
  • GROOMING REQUIREMENTS:          2 Star
  • HEAT SENSITIVITY:                            5 Star
  • VOCALITY                                          2 Star

American Hairless Terrier Characteristics:

  • Dog Breed Group:  Terrier Dogs 
  • Height:  12 to 16 inches
  • Weight:  10 to 16 pounds
  • Life Span: 13 to 16 years 
  • Type: Purebred
  • AREA OF ORIGIN:  United States 
  • DATE OF ORIGIN: 1700s
  • OTHER NAMES:  AHT
  • Temperament: Alert, Lively, Loving, Intelligent, Inquisitive, Playful
  • Activities: Agility, Obedience
  • Color: Black, Sable, Blue, Brindle, Red, and Brown.
  • Litter Size: 3-5 puppies
  • Puppy Prices: $2000 – $4000 USD on average

American Hairless Terrier Health:

Responsible breeders test for hip dysplasia, cardiac disorders, luxating patella (a displaced kneecap akin to what people call a “trick knee”), and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, a hip condition that can be treated surgically.

Skin concerns are uncommon in the breed. As with all breeds, an American Hairless Terrier’s ears should be cleaned on a regular basis to eliminate foreign matter and prevent wax accumulation, and its teeth should be brushed on a regular basis.

The National Breed Club recommends the following health tests:

  • Hip Evaluation
  • Cardiac Exam
  • Patella Evaluation
  • Legg-Calve-Perthe Radiographic

American Hairless Terrier Grooming:

The coats or skin patterns of the Coated Hairless and Hairless American Terriers are highly distinct. AHTs come in a variety of colors, including black, sable, blue, brindle, red, and brown.

Their skin or extremely short, fine coat is sometimes a solid color, and other times it is a blend of two or three hues.

One of the best aspects of the American Hairless Terrier, whether coated or not, is that they make wonderful pets for allergy patients due to their little shedding.

They still shed dander, so they aren’t completely hypoallergenic—no dog is.

Because of their short coats, they will require sun protection even during the cooler months. Apply doggie sunscreen to your AHT before going outside for more than 15 minutes.

Because they lack a coat, you will need to acquire your American Hairless Terrier, a coat, booties, and possibly even a hat for the winter months if you live in a colder climate.

American Hairless Terrier Exercise:

The American Hairless Terrier requires only moderate exercise. Of course, they need to go outside multiple times a day, but quick daily stints in a fenced-in yard or on frequent walks will usually suffice.

They enjoy the physical activity but are equally content to curl up on the couch close to their owner. The breed is amiable and enjoys playing with humans and other dogs.

They excel in various canine activities, including obedience, rally, and agility events, because of their excellent trainability.

American Hairless Terrier Training:

Introductory socialization and puppy training sessions are advised for all breeds.

Between the ages of 7 weeks and four months, gradually introducing the puppy to a wide range of people, places, and situations will help him mature into a well-adjusted, well-mannered adult.

Puppy training lessons teach owners how to spot and avoid behavioral issues and strengthen the link between the puppy and the owner.

Because the American Hairless Terrier is exceptionally bright and eager to please, training is usually a fun and straightforward experience.

American Hairless Terrier Food and Nutrition:

The American Hairless Terrier, like many other Terrier breeds, is susceptible to weight gain.

Keep your AHT healthy and happy by measuring their food and feeding them twice a day on a regular schedule, rather than putting food out for snacking.

The American Hairless Terrier’s dietary demands will alter from puppyhood to adulthood and will continue to change into their senior years, like all dogs.

Because there is just too much variance among dog breeds’ weight, energy, and health—to offer a piece of specific advice, you should consult your veterinarian about your American Hairless Terrier’s diet.

American Hairless Terrier Temperament and Personality:

The American Hairless Terrier, like many terriers, is bright, lively, and intelligent, and enjoys playing, digging, and pursuing small games.

Because of his lack of coat, the breed is unsuitable for hunting, yet he has a strong prey drive.

As a result, playing on a leash or in a fenced yard is advised. The American Hairless Terrier gets along well with children, dogs, and other pets since it is alert, curious, and energetic.

His human family provides him with company and affection, and he thrives on it.

The breed is intelligent, eager to please, and easily trainable. He enjoys activities with his owner and does well in agility and obedience competitions.

The AHT requires attention and validation, which makes them ideal for large families or active city dwellers.

Because the American Hairless Terrier can have a Napoleon complex, it’s critical to begin training early and persistently. AHTs, on the other hand, are extremely intelligent and curious, and they adore pleasing their people.

They may love to challenge you at first, but if you persist with regular training, your AHT will understand the pecking order—even if they do retest it now and then.

Despite their energy, American Hairless Terriers enjoy cuddling as much as they do playing and doing learned skills.

As smaller dogs, they may be more attached to their “primary” human or carer. Still, AHTs will not ignore the rest of the family; they choose favorites.

American Hairless Terrier Care/Upkeep:

You need to keep up with your American Hairless Terrier’s routine veterinary exams, just like you would with any other dog, to spot any health issues early.

Your veterinarian can assist you in developing a care routine that will keep your dog healthy.

American Hairless Terriers are prone to gaining weight and have a lot of energy. This suggests that your AHT requires regular activity.

Make sure your AHT receives at least one solid half-hour walk per day, as well as numerous small active play sessions throughout the day.

Check their ears for debris and bugs daily and clean them as directed by your veterinarian.

Cut your pet’s nails before they become too long, which should be done once or twice a month. They shouldn’t be slamming against the floor. Your groomer can assist you with this.

Maintaining your American Hairless Terrier’s oral health will be your first focus when it comes to their care. Because tiny breeds are prone to dental problems, you should brush their teeth daily.

Your vet can show you how and when to brush your dog’s teeth correctly.

American Hairless Terrier Relationship with Children and Other Pets

Active children will enjoy playing with American Hairless Terriers. It is easier to socialize your AHT with children while they are younger, but you may still introduce an older AHT to children if you do so calmly and gradually.

Children of all ages should understand how to play with a dog responsibly. The American Hairless Terrier is a little dog, and too enthusiastic children could quickly injure your AHT.

In general, American Hairless Terriers get along well with other dogs if introduced carefully and in a peaceful atmosphere. AHTs retain their Rat Terrier parents’ prey instinct; therefore, they may be prone to chase.

Still, every dog is different, and also, how your American Hairless Terrier interacts with children and other animals is a result of training, socialization, and the luck of the draw.

American Hairless Terrier Names 

RankBoy NamesGirl Names
01BuddyMolly
02TuckerZoey
03CooperCoco
04RileyStella
05HenryRuby
06BaileyEllie
07OliverGinger
08SammyPiper
09SamAnnie
10LouiePenny

All About American Hairless Terrier

The American Hairless Terrier is a smooth-muscled, energetic, small to medium-sized terrier. The ideal body length-to-height ratio (prosternum to the point of buttocks) is 10:9.

The head is wide, slightly domed, wedge-shaped, and proportionate to the body size. Ears are V-shaped and positioned on the exterior borders of the head.

They can be upright, tipped, or buttoned. Both kinds may have a natural tail carried in an upward curve, or the tail of the coated version may be docked.

The American Hairless Terrier is available in various skin colors and patterns (hairless variant) and coat colors and patterns (coated variety).

The American Hairless Terrier is a lively, alert dog with a keen sense of curiosity and intelligence that makes him a breeze to train. This breed’s forefathers were bred to hunt.

The hairless species is unsuitable for hunting due to the lack of a coat, but both forms have a strong hunting instinct, and the covered dogs are bold, tenacious hunters with seemingly limitless energy.

The American Hairless Terrier is a charming companion who gets along well with youngsters, other dogs, and even cats. American Hairless Terriers adore human connection and will eagerly participate in any activity with their owners.

The hairless dogs need to be protected from the sunlight as well as the freezing temperatures in the winter. During conformation judging, American Hairless Terriers should not be spared.

American Hairless Terrier History:

The American Hairless Terrier (AHT) is a relatively recent breed that is the only hairless breed native to the United States.

Their origins may be traced back to 1972 when Edwin Scott bred a litter that included a female hairless Rat Terrier.

Scott wasn’t aware of the oddity at first because all AHTs are born with a birth down that comes out after a few weeks.

Mr. Scott bred additional of these hairless terriers from this person, named Josephine, and her progeny. Initially, the dogs were simply known as Rat Terriers of the hairless species.

The Scotts kept up their meticulous breeding effort, and the AKC formally recognized the American Hairless Terrier in 2016.

Because the gene pool is still so tiny, some American Hairless Terriers are still born with a thin coat, known as coated AHTs.

The American Hairless Terrier shares many features with its Rat Terrier ancestors.

This breed was developed in the early nineteenth century in England for use as ratters and was nicknamed “Feists” due to their tiny fiery temperaments.

Where to Adopt American Hairless Terrier

Even in North America, the American Hairless Terrier is an extremely unusual breed. You may need to join a waiting list or go further away to get a puppy from a reputable breeder.

The American Hairless Terrier Club of America can give you further information about registered breeders, and it’s a fantastic place to start your search.

While an AHT will be extremely uncommon to find for adoption, many other great terrier-types are waiting for permanent homes in shelters around the country.

There are also many terrier-specific rescues, such as Rat Bones Rescues, which seek homes for Rat Terriers.

More Dog Breeds and Further Research:

If you’re looking for dogs that are similar to the American Hairless Terrier, you should look at the following breeds:

American Hairless Terrier Fun Facts:

  • It’s easy to characterize the American Hairless dogs apart from the fact that its body is completely devoid of hair. This dog breed is typically small and muscular in nature. 
  • It’s quite an interesting fact that the dog breed’s toes appear slightly longer compared to that of the standard dog breed.
  • After years of breeding, the American Kennel Club finally recognized the breed in 2011. That’s almost 40 years after its owners used Josephine to breed other dogs. 
  • Even though they look different from other terriers, they do carry some of the type’s most common traits. American Hairless Terriers are fun to have as pets. 
  • Any American Hairless Terriers that have hanging ears will automatically be disqualified as a purebred.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs):

Do American hairless terriers have a strong odor?

The American Hairless Terrier has a low likelihood of having a foul odor.

Do American hairless terriers have a lot of barking?

American Hairless Terriers have a habit of barking a lot. But it would be inaccurate to call this dog yappy, they do have a high-pitched bark that is frequently repeated quickly.

Are American Hairless Terriers intelligent?

American Hairless Terriers, like other terriers, are playful, intelligent, curious, and fierce. Although they can be territorial, they are affectionate and enjoy spending time with their family members.

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