Bearded Collie Dog Breed (Complete Guide)

Bearded Collie Dog Overview

The Beardie breed is a medium-sized dog with a long, slender, well-built physique that conveys strength and agility. The gait of this breed is supple and powerful, with good reach and drive.

Sharp twists, quick starts, and sudden stops are needed in a sheep herding breed, and the Beardie must be able to maintain this activity for an extended amount of time under all situations.

This dog has a double coat with a silky, fluffy undercoat.

The outer coat is flat, rough, and fairly straight; it protects the dog but not so much that it obscures the dog’s lines. The Beardie’s face is bright and inquisitive.

Bearded Collie Highlights

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  • Beardies dislike being confined and can become nuisance barkers if left alone on a regular basis.
  • Beardies need about an hour of exercise per day in a fenced-in area where they can run.
  • Beardies can be stubborn, so obedience training is essential. Begin as soon as possible!
  • Bearded Collies will bark to alert you to the presence of strangers, but they are not guard dogs in any way.
  • A bored Beardie is a fantastic escape artist!
  • The Bearded Collie coat requires weekly brushing, with more frequent brushing during the annual shedding season.
  • Some Beardies are sensitive to monthly heartworm preventatives. Consult your veterinarian to determine whether a daily preventative is a better option.

Bearded Collie Breed Features & Ratings:

Rated base on a 5 Star Scale
ENERGY LEVEL:                                4 Star
EXERCISE REQUIREMENTS:           4 Star
PLAYFULNESS:                                  4 Star
AFFECTION LEVEL:                           4 Star
FRIENDLINESS TO DOGS:                3 Star
FRIENDLINESS TO OTHER PETS:    3 Star
FRIENDLINESS TO STRANGERS:     3 Star
WATCHFULNESS:                               2 Star
EASE OF TRAINING:                           3 Star
GROOMING REQUIREMENTS:           4 Star
HEAT SENSITIVITY:                            3 Star
VOCALITY                                         4 Star

Bearded Collie Characteristics:


  • Dog Breed Group:  Herding Dogs
  • Height:  At the shoulder, it should be between 20 and 22 inches tall.
  • Weight:  45 to 55 pounds
  • Life Span: 12 to 14 years
  • Type: Purebred
  • AREA OF ORIGIN: Scotland
  • DATE OF ORIGIN: 1800s
  • OTHER NAMES:  Highland Collie, Mountain Collie, Argyle Bargle, Hairy Mou’ed Collie, Beardie Temperament: Active, Alert, Hardy, Intelligent, Lively, Self-confidence
  • Activities: Tracking, Herding, Conformation, Agility, Obedience
  • Color: Black, blue and fawn, usually with white markings
  • Litter Size: 4 to 12 puppies 
  • Puppy Prices: $1500 – $2000 USD on average

Bearded Collie Health:

The Beardie is a tough breed, and prudent breeders test their breeding stock for health issues like hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism, autoimmune illnesses, allergies, and eye difficulties.

As with all breeds, a Beardie’s ears should be cleaned on a regular basis to eliminate foreign matter and prevent wax accumulation, and his teeth should be washed daily.

The National Breed Club recommends the following health tests:

  • Hip Evaluation
  • Ophthalmologist Evaluation
  • Thyroid Evaluation

Bearded Collie Grooming:

The Beardie has a flat, rough, robust, and shaggy outer coat with a soft, hairy undercoat to shield him from Scottish weather extremes.

The coat falls naturally to either side and does not require a portion. The beard for which he is famous is made up of long hair on the cheeks, lower lips, and beneath the chin.

Bearded Collies are born in a variety of colors, including black, blue, brown, and fawn, with or without white markings. Some have a fading gene, and as they mature, their coat lightens, then darkens slightly after a year.

A black puppy can develop into any shade of gray, from black to slate to silver.

Brown puppies will lighten from chocolate to sandy, while blues and fawns will show colors ranging from dark to light. Dogs that do not have the fading gene remain the color they were when they were born.

The white appears solely as a blaze on the face, head, tip of the tail, chest, legs, feet, and around the neck.

Tan marks can be found on the brows, inside the ears, on the cheeks, under the tail’s root, and on the legs where the white joins the primary color.

To remove tangles and mats and prevent shedding, the Beardie’s lengthy double coat requires weekly brushing with a bristle or pin brush.

Before brushing, mist the coat with a conditioning spray to prevent static and preserve the hairs from breaking.

If you have any mats or tangles, spritz them with anti-tangle spray and work them out with your fingers until you can smoothly run a comb through your hair.

Each week, brushing the coat takes half an hour to an hour. Bathing can be done in your dog on an as-needed basis.

Your Beardie puppy’s smooth puppy coat will begin to emerge as he matures between the ages of 9 and 18 months. Brush him twice a week to help eliminate it and avoid matting.

Once his mature coat has grown in, brushing him once a week will enough.

Beardies breeds shed heavily once a year for two to four weeks, so brush more regularly at this time to keep the volume of loose hair under control.

Dental hygiene and nail care are two more grooming requirements. Brush your Beardie’s teeth at least twice a week to eliminate tartar and the bacteria that live inside it.

Brushing twice a day is even preferable if you want to avoid gum disease and foul breath.

To maintain nails short, they should be cut on a regular basis. Each dog is different, therefore your Beardie’s nails may need to be cut weekly or maybe once a month.

The nails are said to be too long if you can hear them clicking on the floor.

Short, carefully trimmed nails maintain the dog’s feet in good condition and prevent scratches on your legs when your energetic Beardie jumps up to welcome you.

When your Beardie is a puppy, start accustoming him to being brushed and examined. Handle his paws frequently – dogs’ feet are sensitive — and inspect his lips and ears.

Make grooming a pleasurable process full of praise and prizes, and you’ll build the framework for smooth veterinarian tests and other handling when he’s an adult.

Check for sores, rashes, or symptoms of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, ears, nose, mouth, and eyes, and feet while you groom.

Ears should smell pleasant and be free of wax or crud, and eyes should be clear with no redness or discharge. Your thorough weekly examination will assist you in detecting potential health issues early on.

Bearded Collie Exercise:

The Bearded Collie is a loud, energetic breed that requires plenty of outdoor activity. Beardies, unlike many of their owners, are content to run and play outside regardless of the weather.

Every day, they require some form of movement, whether it is ball play, a lengthy walk, run, or trek, or simply playing in a large, fenced-in yard or other area with a buddy, human or canine.

Beardies, being developed to herd sheep, enjoy participating in athletic activities such as herding, rally, agility, and obedience competitions. A Beardie who is busy is a happy Beardie.

Bearded Collie Training:

Bearded Collies, as previously said, are exceptionally clever, high-energy dogs, necessitating continual obedience instruction.

Bearded Collies have independent personalities and can be highly stubborn, but beginning obedience training as a puppy can assist.

Because Bearded Collies are exceptionally intelligent, it is critical to keep training fun. To keep your Beardie interested, try integrating food rewards or playtime.

Bearded Collie Food and Nutrition:

The nutrition of your dog is mostly determined by their age, activity level, and metabolism, but in general, you should feed your Bearded Collie one and a half to two cups of high-quality, high-protein dog food every day.

Bearded Collies, like many dog breeds, can become obese if they are overfed and insufficiently exercised.

If you’re unsure how much quality of food to feed your Bearded Collie, consult with your vet about the best and appropriate diet for your pet. Also, remember to go light on the sweets.

Bearded Collie Temperament and Personality:

A Beardie is intelligent, resourceful, and self-assured. His exuberant, effervescent demeanor makes him enjoyable to be around, but he may be an independent thinker who prefers to do things his own way when it comes to training.

He’s a loud playmate for kids with a sense of humor that makes him a pleasure to be around. When selecting a Beardie puppy, keep in mind that temperament is influenced by various factors, including inheritance, training, and socialization.

Puppies with good temperaments are interested and playful, eager to approach and be held by people. Choose the puppy in the midst of the pack, not the one who is tearing up his littermates or hiding in the corner.

Individual dogs have different temperaments. Some Beardies are gentle and peaceful, while others are boisterous and animated.

Tell the breeder what you’re looking for in a dog, and she’ll help you choose the puppy that’s right for you and your lifestyle.

Always meet at least one of the parents (typically, the mother is the available one) to make sure that they have pleasant personalities with which you are comfortable.

Meeting the parents’ siblings or other relatives is also beneficial in determining what a puppy will be like when he grows up.

Bearded Collie Care/Upkeep:

Beardie is a mixed-breed dog who can be found both indoors and outside.

He must live inside with his folks and have access to a yard or fenced-in property where he can run. Beardies love spending time with their owners, whether they are indoors or outdoors.

They’ll be content with a few half-hour walks or ball play sessions every day. If you want to establish order and discipline in your dog’s life, obedience training is necessary.

Make learning enjoyable for children by employing positive reinforcement tactics such as food rewards, play, and praise.

Bearded Collies do not learn in cruel or severe environments. Start training as soon as possible, and you will see amazing results.

Teach him to sit for attention to avoid accidentally knocking over a toddler or an older adult.

Bearded Collie Relationship with Children and Other Pets

Beardies are fantastic playmates for children because they are full of bounce, humor, and enthusiasm.

Of course, children should be taught how to approach and touch dogs, and any interactions between dogs and kids should always be monitored to avoid any biting or ear or tail pulling on either party’s behalf.

No canine should be left alone with a youngster. Beardies get along well with other dogs and cats if exposed to them at a young age, though they can be territorial of their toys. Their motto is “my, all mine.”

These dogs are up for a game of chase, so they prefer cats who stand their ground rather than turn tail and flee.

Bearded Collie Names 

RankBoy NamesGirl Names
01CooperDaisy
02BuddyMolly
03TobyLucy
04OliverStella
05BearLuna
06BentleyCoco
07LuckySadie
08JoeyBailey
09TeddyGracie
10BanditZoey

All About Bearded Collie

The most frequent word used to define a Bearded Collie is energetic! Coupled with hardy, exuberant, active, energetic, brilliant, reliable, and trustworthy, that term should paint a picture of this popular breed.

The Bearded Collie, sometimes known as the Beardie, is the ultimate hairy dog.

The Bearded Collie takes its title from the hair that falls from the chin and forms a beard. The Beardie’s exuberant personality reflects his passion.

Beardies working in thick vegetation in Scotland are believed to bounce up to check where the sheep were, and when challenged by recalcitrant sheep, they bark and bounce in front of it to urge it to go.

On the other hand, Bearded Collies go through life with a perpetually wagging tail and a cheerful, clownish demeanor.

Nonetheless, they are not for everyone. Bearded dragons are extremely clever, active, and resourceful. It takes a quick thinker and a lot of energy to keep up with them.

People who live with Beardies must like brushing their long hair and be prepared to deal with a beard of hair that drops water after every drink and hairy feet that track in mud and debris after every outdoor adventure.

Bearded Collies are gregarious and will insist on being included in all family activities, indoors and out. A bored Beardie will use his great intelligence and drive to create havoc.

Beardies are friendly, affectionate dogs, but their background requires them to make their judgments while herding sheep so they can be headstrong and independent.

If you want to establish order and discipline in your dog’s life, obedience training is necessary. Make learning enjoyable for children by employing positive reinforcement tactics such as food rewards, play, and praise

Bearded Collies do not learn in cruel or severe environments. Start training as soon as possible, and you will see amazing results.

Beardies are attentive and make effective watchdogs due to their herding history, barking to inform you that someone has arrived.

They’ll also bark if they’re joyful or excited or if they’re bored or lonely and want to be seen. Teach them to limit their barking when they’re young, or you’ll end up with a nuisance barker.

Bearded Collie History:

The Bearded Collie is one of the earliest breeds in the United Kingdom. Shaggy herding dogs of this variety, also known as the Highland Collie, Mountain Collie, or Hairy Mou’ed Collie, have been used as agricultural helpers for ages.

Farmers were bred for working aptitude and did not keep records, so it is unknown how the Beardie came to be; however, it is thought that a Polish merchant visiting Scotland in the 1500s swapped a pair of Polish Lowland Sheepdogs for other commodities.

These dogs were most likely crossed with local sheepdogs to produce the Bearded Collie. The earliest pictorial depictions of Bearded Collie-type dogs are in a Gainsborough portrait from 1771 and a Reynolds portrait from 1772.

A description of the dog breed was published in the Live Stock Journal in 1818.

Bearded Collies were popular working and showed dogs around the end of the Victorian era, but they didn’t have a breed organization or an official standard (a written description of how the breed should look and act).

Shepherds who respected their working talents and continued to employ them as working sheepdogs kept the breed alive. G.O. Willison, who started breeding Beardies for the show ring after World War II, is credited with the current Bearded Collie’s evolution.

In 1955, she was influential in establishing the Bearded Collie Club in the United Kingdom. The Kennel Club allowed the permission to display for Challenge Certificates and Championships in 1959. Following then, the breed grew in popularity.

Bearded Collies first arrived in the United States in the late 1950s, but no dogs were bred. In 1967, the first litter was born in the United States. By 1969, enough people interested in the Beardie started the Bearded Collie Club of America.

On February 1, 1977, the breed was accepted into the American Kennel Club’s Working Group. It was transferred to the Herding Entity in January 1983, when that group was formed.

The Bearded Collie is now ranked 104th out of the 155 breeds and variations registered with the AKC.

Where to Adopt Bearded Collie:

If you wish to adopt a Bearded Collie, look into your local animal shelter or a Bearded Collie rescue organization in your area.

If a Bearded Collie is not available, they may be able to refer you to another shelter or rescue group that has dogs for adoption.

If you decide to acquire a Bearded Collie from a breeder, do your homework. Inquire frequently with your breeder, such as “Where are the dogs kept?” as well as “How many litters do you produce at a time?” to guarantee they are a recognized, ethical breeder.

Visit the breeder’s house or breeding facility if feasible and ask to meet the parents of your Bearded Collie’s litter.

An unclean facility, sick dogs, or heavily discounted puppies are all huge red signs for a backyard breeder. To guarantee that your breeder is growing dogs responsibly, be cautious and ask a lot of questions.

More Dog Breeds and Further Research:

Bearded Collies are bright, loyal, and affectionate dogs that are perfect for active families with spacious yards.

Beardies may not be suitable for first-time dog owners or families with highly hectic schedules because of their high grooming and activity requirements.

As usual, do your homework before bringing a new pet into your home.

If you’re looking for further information about the Bearded Collie, go to:

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs):

Do Bearded Collies have a strong odor?

Bearded collies, on the whole, have a low risk of unpleasant odor. The smell of bearded collies is also affected by how you groom them on a daily basis. Because of their long hair, they can become rather messy if not properly cared for.

How much exercise does a bearded collie require?

Bearded Collies encompass a lot of energy and require 1-2 hours of exercise per day. They enjoy playing games and will participate enthusiastically, making them ideal family pets. Beardies must be groomed daily to preserve their lovely long coat in good shape.

How quickly do bearded collies mature?

Expect him to grow rapidly until he is six months old, then slow down and grow in spurts until he is 18 months old or even older. His family is really important to him. Some lines complete all of their growth in 6-7 months and only add a quarter of an inch after that.

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