Beagle-Harrier Dog Breed (Complete Guide)

Beagle-Harrier Dog Overview

The Beagle Harrier appears to be a larger version of the Beagle or a smaller version of the Harrier.

It is a medium-sized dog, measuring between 45 and 50 cm (18 and 20 inches) at the withers and weighing between 19 and 21 kg (42 to 46 pounds).

Its coat is often multicolored, consisting of fawn, black, tan, and white. Additionally, grey-coated (tricolor) Beagle Harriers exist.

The Beagle-body Harrier’s is typically muscular, with a silky, thick coat.

In general, the Beagle Harrier gets along well with children and other pets. They are devoted, determined, yet peaceful and relaxed at home, making them excellent family pets.

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As a hunting breed, they demand a great deal of exercise and space.

Beagle-Harrier Highlights

  • The dog originated in France and was bred for hunting. Its appearance is comparable to that of the Beagle and Harrier. It has a proportionate frame and a tricolored coat. It is loving toward both family and visitors.
  • The Beagle-Harrier has a keen sense of smell.
  • It is capable of being stubborn and tough to teach. This breed is best suited to homes with yards and open areas.
  • Individuals who lead sedentary lifestyles should avoid this breed. The dog breed is quite rare in France and throughout the world.
  • Puppy Cost: Approximately $400–600 USD.

Beagle-Harrier Breed Features & Ratings:

Rated base on a 5 Star Scale
ENERGY LEVEL:                                4 Star
EXERCISE REQUIREMENTS:           5 Star
PLAYFULNESS:                                  5 Star
AFFECTION LEVEL:                           5 Star
FRIENDLINESS TO DOGS:                5 Star
FRIENDLINESS TO OTHER PETS:    5 Star
FRIENDLINESS TO STRANGERS:     5 Star
WATCHFULNESS:                               5 Star
EASE OF TRAINING:                           5 Star
GROOMING REQUIREMENTS:           2 Star
HEAT SENSITIVITY:                              5 Star
VOCALITY                                             5 Star

Beagle-Harrier Characteristics:

  • Dog Breed Group: Hound Dogs
  • Height:  18-20 inches (45-50 cm)
  • Weight:  42-46 pounds (19-21 kg)
  • Life Span: 12 to 14 years 
  • Type: Crossbreed
  • AREA OF ORIGIN: France 
  • DATE OF ORIGIN: 19th Century
  • OTHER NAMES: Beagle Harrier, French Beagle-Harrier
  • Temperament: Calm, Determined, Loyal, Spirited
  • Activities:
  • Color: Black, Brown, White, Tricolor
  • Litter size: 4 to 6 puppies 
  • Puppy Prices: Average $1500 – $2500 USD

Beagle-Harrier Health:

In general, Beagle Harrier dogs are healthy. However, they, like many other dog breeds, are prone to specific health problems.

Their most prevalent health issue is hip dysplasia. Always maintain an open line of communication with a veterinarian in your neighborhood.

As with their history, little information is available on the Beagle-health. Harrier’s The majority of fanciers appear to believe that the Beagle-Harrier is in relatively good health, as is the case with the majority of comparable breeds.

However, due to their extremely restricted genetic pool, the Beagle-Harrier may be at danger of acquiring a variety of health problems.

Although no health studies on the Beagle-Harrier have been undertaken, numerous studies have been conducted on closely related breeds such as the Beagle.

The findings indicate that the Beagle-Harrier may be predisposed to a variety of hereditary illnesses, including ear infections, hip and elbow dysplasia, reverse sneezing, demodectic mange, and progressive retinal atrophy.

Beagle-Harrier Grooming:

Due to the short coat of the Beagle-Harrier, they require just minimal maintenance, with a weekly brush sufficing.

They require almost minimal coat trimming and should be washed solely at the owner’s discretion if they become entangled in something.

Their ears, which are prone to moisture buildup and hence may develop ear infections, do require more active monitoring.

Their nails will also require monitoring, as if not used often for hunting, they may grow to unusual lengths and cause discomfort through cracking or breaking.

Beagle-Harrier Exercise:

While these canines are only medium-sized dogs, Beagle Harriers require a significant amount of exercise to stay happy and healthy, owing to their hunting lineage’s stamina.

In comparison to other breeds, they require a lot of exercise, at least 18 miles of walking weekly or at least 60 minutes of exercise daily.

Given their ancestors were hunters, activities that engage both their mental and physical capacities will go a long way toward exhausting them in a meaningful way.

Games and activities that use several senses, such as fetch, agility training, or even scent hunting, are very satisfying for this breed, as this breed thrives on having purposeful work.

They thrive in environments where they are continually accompanied.

A couple of hours of playtime on a consistent basis helps guarantee that the dog’s exercise requirements are met and that he or she remains calm and well behaved indoors.

Beagle-Harrier Training:

The Beagle-Harrier is a highly intelligent problem solver, but like the majority of scent hounds, it is considered difficult to train. Although not as outwardly defiant and belligerent as many Terriers, the Beagle-Harrier is unmistakably strong-willed and exceedingly tenacious.

When a Beagle-Harrier makes a decision not to do something, no amount of correction or reward can sway it. Although this breed responds significantly better to training approaches that focus food rewards, these methods do not ensure success. 

This is not to say that training a Beagle-Harrier is impossible; rather, it means that working with this breed will involve significantly more time, patience, and effort than working with many other breeds and may never yield the desired results.

Particularly when this dog picks up a smell, it is quite tough to train it to return.

That said, people looking for a companion or hunting dog and are unconcerned with advanced behaviors or tricks will likely be quite content with one of these dogs, as Beagle-Harriers quickly pick up on basic manners, socializing, and scent trailing.

Beagle-Harrier Food and Nutrition:

How much food a mature dog consumes is determined by its size, age, structure, metabolism, and degree of activity. Dogs, like people, are individuals, and they do not all require the same amount of food.

Beagle Harriers are a medium-sized breed of dog. As a result, their diet should be designed for a medium-sized breed with moderate to vigorous exercise requirements. Consult a veterinarian in your region for more specific recommendations.

Beagle-Harrier Temperament and Personality:

The Beagle Harrier is a gentle and well-mannered dog that enjoys its owners’ and family members’ presence.

If socialized early, they are also comfortable mingling with children and pets, including other family dogs. As a hound and a hunting dog, this breed is attracted to a variety of scents and may even escape if enticed by a scent trail.

They exhibit energy and vigor when participating in activities like hunting games, but can also be loyal, calm, and peaceful, with a strong sense of self-worth, when at home. As a result, they make excellent family pets.

However, due to their ardent nature, they are more suited to rural and suburban areas than to cities.

Beagle-Harrier Care/Upkeep:

Taking proper care of animals is critical when rearing Beagle Harrier puppies. As a hunting dog, they require a high level of activity and exercise to burn off excess calories.

Take them out for vigorous activities on a regular basis, such as daily jogging and walking sessions. It is better to have an enclosed space with high fencing where your dog can play alone or with its family.

Due to the short coat of the Beagle Harrier, intensive maintenance is not required. They require simply a few easy brushings per week to ensure that dead hairs are removed.

Beagle-Harrier Relationship with Children and Other Pets

The Harrier is said to be fantastic with youngsters. That, like other breeds, comes with some restrictions.

Always teach youngsters how to approach and touch dogs, and supervise any interactions between dogs and small children to avoid biting or ear or tail pulling on either party’s side.

Teach your child to never approach a dog that is eating or attempt to grab the dog’s food. A child should never be left alone with a dog.

Harriers like being in the company of other dogs, whether or not they are Harriers. Smaller animals, such as cats, may be seen as prey by them.

If they haven’t been raised with them since they were puppies, keep an eye on their interactions with cats and other pets.

Beagle-Harrier Names 

RankBoy NamesGirl Names
01BuddyMolly
02CodyLola
03JakeLuna
04DukeGinger
05OliverNala
06JaxEllie
07DieselRosie
08OllieLady
09LouieZoey
10ZeusRoxy

All About Beagle-Harrier

The Beagle-Harrier is a French dog breed. The breed’s origins are unknown.

The rumor is that crossing Beagles and Harriers created the breed or shares an ancestral lineage with the unique Beagle and Harrier breeds found in certain extinct Southern Hounds.

The breed is classified as a scent hound and was designed primarily for tracking and hunting.

The dog resembles an enlarged Beagle or a compressed Harrier in looks and shares the majority of their personality features. Even in its native habitat, the breed is now scarce.

The dogs require a consistent diet, but portion control is necessary to keep them from overeating. The breed will consume anything it comes across.

Their acute sense of smell aids them in plundering whatever food supply they can find. The Beagle-Harrier is a vivacious and energetic breed.

It is accustomed to broad expanses and fields as a hunter. The dog is cheerful and vivacious and enjoys playing.

To maintain control of its energy, it needs access to a space where it can express itself.

Beagle-Harrier History:

The Beagle Harrier was developed in France in the nineteenth century by one Baron Gerard. There is evidence that this breed arose from imported English scent hounds.

However, it is unknown whether they were a direct product of the cross between the Beagle and the Harrier or were bred from extinct breeds such as the Southern Hounds, which are believed to have contributed genetically to the development of the Harrier and Beagle breeds.

The FCI and CKC recognized the Beagle Harrier in 1974, classifying it as a ‘Hound’. Currently, this breed is almost extinct in France and even rarer in other areas of the world.

Where to Adopt Beagle-Harrier:

Harriers are so rare there aren’t many rescue groups dedicated to finding them new homes.

More Dog Breeds and Further Research:

If you are interested in this breed please take time to read about these related breeds:

Beagle-Harrier Fun Facts:

  • Some Harriers can be stubborn and difficult to housetrain.
  • Harriers tend to be vocal and some love to howl.
  • Some Harriers like to dig.
  • Harriers are high-energy dogs and have a great deal of stamina. 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs):

Are Harrier Beagles rare?

Even though these are rare purebred dogs, some may still end up in the care of shelters or rescues.

How much exercise does a Harrier Beagle need?

Compared to other breeds, they rank high in terms of necessary exercise, meaning they need at least 18 miles of walks weekly or at least 60 minutes of exercise daily.

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